All Dressed Up With Everywhere To Go

Scandinavians say, “There is no bad weather, only bad clothing.” Thanks to materials both time-tested and cutting edge, cyclists nowadays have access to a vast array of layers to shield them from the elements, and stay on their bikes year-round.

Scandinavians say, “There is no bad weather, only bad clothing.” Thanks to materials both time-tested and cutting edge, cyclists nowadays have access to a vast array of layers to shield them from the elements, and stay on their bikes year-round. However, with variables like temperature, precipitation, wind, cloud cover, season—and especially personal comfort level—it’s impossible to provide a simple answer to what will work best for you. It can take a year of riding to really nail down preferred go-to combinations, but with the experience of a full season, you can shrug off even the most inclement conditions.

These are only suggestions. You must ultimately use your own best judgment when dressing for a ride. At both ends of the spectrum remember: When it’s cold, skin does freeze, and when it’s hot, heat stroke can kill. Our clothing recommendation guide provides advice about how to dress based on our commutes of 10–15 miles or longer, where non-cycling specific clothing might not be sufficient.

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